Tips for RVing in the Fall

Don’t give up on the RVing season yet! RVing in the fall is a terrific time to get out and enjoy the cooler temps!Hiking in a Winnebago View

  1. Pack Layers – Fall is prime season for unpredictable weather. You can check the daily weather forecast and try to prepare for it, but need to that conditions changing is always a possibility. Packing clothing layers helps with fluctuating temperatures throughout the day, from cool mornings to warm afternoons and chilly nights. This tried-and-true strategy allows the whole family to stay comfortable by adding or removing layers the weather or your activity level changes.
  2. Fill Up Your Propane – Don’t leave home without a full tank of propane. We all know that nothing uses up propane in the RV more than the heater, and you’re going to need it at night. While many campgrounds offer propane, they charge a premium for the convenience.
  3. Properly Inflate Tires – This is often an overlooked item, but you’ve got a lot riding on your tires. Did you know that for every 10 degrees of temperature drop, your tires can lose one to two pounds of pressure? It is important to keep your tires within the recommended inflation to maintain traction, handling and durability. The most important thing is the safety of you and your family. We also tend to pack quite a bit of gear, and under-inflation has an impact on carrying capacity, which is the greatest amount of weight your vehicle can safely haul.
  4. Be Prepared for Shorter Camping Days – We get spoiled camping in the summer with long stretches of daylight and have to be prepared to adjust for our fall trips. The first consideration is arrival time at the campground. No one likes to set up their campsite after dark. Things can get tricky when you can’t see well. Plan ahead to be sure you’re taking the earlier sunset into account. Try the weather channel app to get the accurate sunrise and sunset times. Also, pack a few flashlights or lanterns in case you’re unexpectedly delayed. Even better, a good headlamp allows you to have full use of your hands while lighting your way.
  5. Get Ready for the Campfire – One of the best ways to enjoy cooler evenings is sitting around the warmth of a campfire. Obviously, every good fire needs some s’mores, so pack the graham crackers, marshmallows and chocolate. Even more importantly, don’t forget the sticks!
  6. Take a Trip Close to Home – You don’t have to travel far to have fun! If the kids are in school or you can’t get away from work, you can still enjoy an amazing weekend camping trip close to home. You may feel like you know your local area pretty well, but sometimes we miss the hidden treasures right under our noses. Even better, staying close to home with save you money on one of the most expensive aspects of RV travel: fuel.

Fall is a great time to pack up the RV and enjoy a great weekend of camping!

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last five consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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Family-Friendly Fall RVing Destinations

There are several family-friendly destinations for RVing. We chose some of our favorites from across the United States!

Winnebago View RVing in the Fall

Steamboat Springs, CO – Catch the changing of the leaves in all their glory in Steamboat Springs, Colo. Nestled in the Yampa Valley, Steamboat Springs is an unspoiled mountain town where your trip is more affordable than Aspen or Vail, but offers similar breathtaking views.

Steamboat Springs offers two year-round hot springs. Strawberry Park Hot Springs is located seven miles from downtown Steamboat and is surrounded by yellow aspens during the fall. There are multiple pools with various temperatures. Old Town Hot Springs features eight natural mineral pools, 230-foot water slides and a fitness center. Located downtown, this location promises family fun for everyone.

As for outdoor activities, a variety of trails are perfect for hikers and bikers alike, while the Yampa River is a fly-fishing haven. The Steamboat Lake State Park offers trout fishing below Hahn’s Peak. The 4-mile Emerald Mountain Quarry Trail offers glimpses of Mt. Werner and the downtown area. Or find yourself on top of the Continental Divide on the six-mile Rabbit Ears Peak Trail.

Looking to relax? Downtown Steamboat offers dining and shopping options for all tastes.

Quechee State Park, VT – The East Coast is known for its colors in the fall, and to leave an East Coast destination off an autumn list of RV trips just wouldn’t be right. One of the best places to view the changing leaves is Quechee State Park.

While you are there take in the views of the Quechee Gorge. Vermont’s deepest gorge, formed by glacial activity about 13,000 years ago, you can view the Ottauquechee River flowing 165 feet below. The river offers brook trout, rainbow trout and brown trout fishing, as well as the Quechee Gorge Trail.

Visit the nearby Vermont Institute of Natural Sciences (VINS) Nature Center which offers live special educational bird programs, exhibits, nature trails and avian rehab in action. Another nearby attraction is Sugarbush Farm. Visit a working Vermont farm that offers free admission, free samples and the chance to visit with real farmers. Those who left reviews recommend trying the maple syrup and cheese

Willamette Valley, OR – Visit Willamette Valley, Ore., for a taste of all things fall. Willamette Valley truly celebrates the autumn season, with festivals and events nearly every weekend. Septemberfest, Sublimity Harvest Festival, Oktoberfest, Barn Dance at the Oregon Garden and Corvallis Craft Beer Week are just some of the events that take place.

For those who enjoy a glass of vino, the Carlton Winemakers Studio in Willamette Valley is a must stop. A communal concept, various boutique winemakers use the space to create unique and experimental wines with state-of-the-art equipment, while sharing the cost of production.

Other wineries such as August Cellars, Day Camp and Southeast Wine Collective are just a few of the options for travelers to stop in. Aside from a great glass, vineyards create a beautiful autumn landscape.

Coloma, MI – Take a trip to Coloma, Mich., where you’re near Lake Michigan and fall fun. At Lake Michigan you can relax on white sand beaches, visit lighthouses or spend the day kayaking and paddle boarding. If you’re feeling adventurous, travel the Paw Paw River Water Trail that runs 66 miles through a wildlife rich floodplain forest corridor through Van Buren and Berrien Counties.

In the heart of Michigan’s fruit country, visit u-pick farms, fruit markets, and enjoy picking apples from an orchard and a cup of cider. There are also award-winning vineyards nearby. Take everyone to Jollay Orchards, a family friendly farm where kids and parents alike can enjoy the best fruit Michigan has to offer.

Glacier National Park, MT – Many people think visiting Montana means a trip through Yellowstone National Park. And while that is a great trip to take, one of Montana’s lesser-known jewels is Glacier National Park.

While you’re there, make sure you travel Going-to-the-Sun Road. The road spans 50 miles, crossing the Continental Divide at Logan Pass. While on the road you will see glaciers, valleys, waterfalls, mountains and colorful wildflowers. Most visitors also witness wildlife sightings on the trip.

Glacier offers hiking, ranger-led programs, guided tours, beautiful scenery for photographers, biking, fishing, boating and other special events depending on the time of the year. Since the high elevations here can mean early snow, Glacier National Park makes a perfect early fall destination – keep this in mind when planning.

Special places to visit in the park include Lake McDonald Valley, Many Glacier, St. Mary, Two Medicine, North Fork and Goat Haunt.

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last five consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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Fall RVing Packing List

Whether you are ready for it or not, the Fall Season will soon be upon us. Just because the temperature is changing doesn’t mean your RVing fun needs to come to an end. It may just mean you need to pack a little differently than you did for warmer weather and perhaps arrive at your campsite a bit earlier in the day to get set up before the earlier fall sunsets. In the fall, depending on your location, freezing temps in the morning, can turn into mid 70’s by afternoon, so you need to be prepared for a little bit of everything!

Top Fall RVing Must Haves

Fall Rving Must Haves

LAYER UP/CLOTHINGPrepare for Rain, Wind and the Morning Chill

  1. Light Jacket (i.e. fleece and puffer jackets) that are wind and water resistant
  2. Rain Pants
  3. Mid and Outer Layers including a moisture-wicking base layer
  4. Waterproof/Hiking boots
  5. A backup pair of Shoes (if you don’t want to spend the day in boots)
  6. Warm Socks
  7. Hand and Foot Warmers
  8. Warm Hat – (heat escapes through your head so the easiest way to stay warm is to put on a hat)
  9. Gloves/Mittens
  10. Thermal Underwear dependent on what outdoor activities you have planned
  11. And…don’t forget your favorite sports team apparel! Be sure to pack your apparel supporting your favorite team to ensure you are ready for the game (or to watch a rerun of an old game, depending how the season unfolds.)

CAMPING GEAR

  1. Insulated cup for hot beverages and some cool weather eats such as hot cocoa, soup, chili
  2. Additional Blanket for Bed/s and throw blankets
  3. Bug Spray (‘tis the season)
  4. Backpack – Fall is a great time to go exploring, so if you don’t already have a travel bag in the coach, now’s the time to throw one in.
  5. Sunscreen – Ensure you still have sunscreen in the coach for those warm fall afternoons
  6. Ensure your First Aid Kit remains stocked after Summer Travels
  7. Lantern or portable light source if plan on traveling any distance from your and some extra batteries to ensure you are prepared for shorter days.
  8. Binoculars –Fall is a great time to see wildlife.
  9. Bring a couple of extra towels or something to dry any of the items you may have left outdoors overnight that may be wet by AM with rain or frost.
  10. Water – It is easy to get dehydrated with cooler, dryer temperatures so be sure to drink plenty of water.
  11. If you decide to light a campfire – don’t assume you’ll be able to find dry kindling and logs to get your fire started. Get from your campground or bring along some items to get your fire started.

As always with RVing, a little planning ahead goes a long way in ensuring an enjoyable trip. So don’t let Fall mean the end of your camping season, Layer up and enjoy!

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last five consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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Featured Part: Camco Flying Insect Screen

Wasps, mud dauber nests, birds, and rodents pose a serious threat to your RV furnace. These and other pests can enter through vents and openings and cause serious damage by building nests that interfere with air flow in and out of your furnace. Camco Flying Insect Screen

Protect your valuable investment by purchasing and installing Camco’s flying insect screens. These easy-to-install screens will help ensure that your furnace and fan stay safe from costly invasion by unwanted pests.

Visit our parts web page here.

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last five consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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Winnebago View, Navion and Era Winterizations

With the winter months fast approaching many RV owners must get their motorhome winterized, and ready for storage. We have recorded several RV winterization videos that will walk you through step-by-step on how to get your RV ready. In all of our videos, one of our RVDA/RVIA certified RV technicians will show you exactly what to do.

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If you are not interested in winterizing your RV yourself, we can help! Call our service department at 1-800-343-6255 and schedule your winterization service today.

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last five consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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RV Winterization Videos in Our Video Library 

RV Winterization Videos

With the winter months fast approaching many RV owners must get their motorhome winterized, and ready for storage. We have recorded several RV winterization videos that will walk you through step-by-step on how to get your RV ready. In all of our videos, one of our RVDA/RVIA certified RV technicians will show you exactly what to do.

Watch our videos on winterizing below: 

If you are not interested in winterizing your RV yourself, we can help! Call our service department at 1-800-343-6255 and schedule your winterization service today.

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last five consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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How to go Dry Camping

One of the greatest things about having an RV is the ability to get in on dry camping or boondocking. Unfortunately, many RVers don’t even know this opportunity exists and therefore miss out entirely.

If RV dry camping is something you’d like to try but you’re not sure how to get started, this is the article for you. Here we will address common boondocking questions and let you in on our favorite dry camping tips.

Some of you may be wondering, “What does dry camping mean?” Basically, this is a term that means camping without any hookups whatsoever. Dry camping, also known as boondocking, can be done on private property (with permission, of course), on government-owned lands, or anywhere else you can find a place to park legally. In most cases this is free camping, so it’s a great option for those on a tight budget.

Tips for Dry Camping

The next thing that most people want to know is how to dry camp. Our number one tip is to dip your toes in first and build up to longer trips as you find your own boondocking groove.

Water Tips: 
Without water or sewer hookups, you will want to learn some ways to carry extra water, how to conserve this precious resource, and ways to get rid of the waste water properly.

Get a bladder — A water bladder such as this one is a great way to carry extra water. Use it to refill your fresh water tank when it runs dry.

Change your shower head and faucets — A low-flow shower head as well as low-flow faucets, can save a lot of water.

Reuse shower or dish water — Instead of using fresh water to flush your toilet, collect your dish and shower water and use it when it’s time to flush. This saves fresh water and makes more room in your gray tank when needed.

Shower less — Of course, showering less helps too. Dry shampoo and wipes help a lot.

Invest in a blue boy — A blue boy can hold onto waste water when your tanks get full and you’re unable to make it to a dump station. It’s also easier to transport a blue boy to and from a dump station than it is to move your entire rig every time you need to dump.

Electricity Tips
Beside water, you’ll also need to find ways to conserve and create electricity when boondocking. Obviously, things like running the air conditioner or a hair dryer are typically out of the question without electric hookups, and even things like lights and vent fans can drain a battery faster than you might imagine.Revel Boondocking

Change to LED lighting — Changing all of your lights to LED will help save electricity.

Get a solar panel — A portable solar panel is relatively inexpensive and can be extremely helpful when it comes to keeping your RV battery topped up.

Invest in more batteries — Of course, having more batteries to work with will also mean more electricity to use when off-grid. Combine these with multiple solar panels for best results.

Use a generator — Most motorhomes come with a camping generator. Meanwhile, those using travel trailers will need to invest in a separate one. Either way, using a generator is a great way to top up your battery and even run the A/C on really hot afternoons. Just be aware that generators shouldn’t be run constantly, or at night out of respect for other campers.

Post originally seen on RVShare.com

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last four consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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Top 15 Camping Cities in the USA

 

The Top 15 Camping Cities in the US

You already know you’re going camping this year. The only question is: where to?

If you’ve never traveled by motorhome or trailer before, you may be wondering how to go about finding camping spots — or how to narrow down the best places to camp from the huge number of options on your destination bucket list. The good news is, the U.S. is chock-a-block full of amazing places to explore in your RV. The only problem is trying to see them all in just one lifetime!

Which means, of course, that you’ve got some narrowing down to do. After all, most of us can’t quite afford to be on permanent vacation. (Full-time RV living is a thing though, and quite a popular one.

But whether you’re a weekend warrior looking for a quick getaway spot or planning your next epic cross-country road trip, we’ve put together some of the very best campgrounds and camping locations in the U.S.A — and some surefire tips to help you find great spots no matter where you’re headed.

The Top Camping Spots in the U.S.

In no particular order, here are some of the best places to go camping in the U.S., including national parks which have some of the top campgrounds in the nation.

1. Moab, Utah

Nestled right between two of the most popular national parks in the system — Arches and Canyonlands — Moab is the perfect place to plant yourself if you’re looking to explore southeastern Utah’s surreal desert landscape. See the stunning, delicate expanses of sandstone arches and glowing red mesas carved by centuries of geological activity, or take a thrilling whitewater ride down the ancient Colorado River.

Plus, once you’ve had your fill of outdoor fun (if that’s possible), Moab itself has a whole lot to offer in the way of slightly-citified excitement. Enjoy a bite at one of its many well-loved local eateries, or meander through its gift shops and informational centers. The town is also home to a variety of museums with tons of local historical artifacts and educational opportunities. The Museum of Moab has a world-class collection of dinosaur bones on display, too — so it’s a can’t-miss if you have an aspiring paleontologist along for the ride!

2. Glacier National Park and Whitefish, Montana


Image via skimag.com

If your camping bucket list includes Glacier National Park — and whose doesn’t? — don’t miss the chance to enjoy this quaint northern Montana town while you’re in the area. Along with a plethora of shops from which to source your (absolutely mandatory) bear spray, Whitefish also offers a vibrant art scene, as well as an array of culinary delights you might not have expected to find at such an extreme latitude. Meander through the many galleries that line the small, walkable downtown, and then dip into one of its breweries or fine restaurants to take the edge off. A personal recommendation: visit Montana Coffee Traders, which combines a restful atmosphere with great java and a slam-dunk menu of freshly-cooked breakfast options. (No, they’re not paying us to say this.)

3. Saint Augustine, Florida

Not only is Saint Augustine one of the best places to go camping on the east coast — it’s also one of the oldest. Actually, it’s the oldest city in America, not just on the east coast but overall. Settled all the way back in 1565 by Spanish explorers, the city’s been constantly inhabited by one population or another for more than 450 years. (And yes, that makes it older than both Plymouth Rock and Jamestown.)

This beachside gem is the perfect spot to set up camp along the dunes, perhaps at Anastasia State Park. The sites are affordable, but the sights are downright priceless, and you’re just a few minutes’ drive from the town’s historic center, with all manner of food, drink, shopping, and — of course — ghost tour options to choose from. Experiences you are absolutely not allowed to miss: cannon firings at the Castillo de San Marcos, a horse-drawn carriage ride through the city streets, shopping on St. George Street, and cocktails at the Ice Plant to round it all out. Oh, and an ice cream-topped waffle at Cousteau’s. (Thank us later.)

4. Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Gatlinburg, Tennessee

Great Smoky Mountains stands out from its US national parks peer group in a variety of ways. For one thing, it’s the most popular. For another, few of the national parks have such a vibrant gateway city — and fewer still are free to enter.

With hundreds of miles of hiking trails along some of the most lushly green mountain paths you’ll ever see, Great Smoky Mountains is a can’t-miss destination, especially for native east coasters. Covering more than 522,427 acres, the park is a reasonable drive from a huge number of eastern metropoles, and offers much-needed natural respite to those city dwellers. And even if Gatlinburg is a little bit out of your way, it’s worth the extra miles to stay there. You can round out your days of outdoorsy exploration with all sorts of mountain town fun, from tastings at moonshine distilleries to ski lifts that operate even in the summer. (Oh, and Pigeon Forge is just half an hour up the road, home to a downright disproportionate number of dinner shows and live entertainment options. No wonder Dolly Parton loves it here so much!)

5. Joshua Tree National Park and Twentynine Palms, California

If you’ve yet to go to this alien desert landscape, where the trees twist into the sky like reaching arms, you won’t regret setting your RV GPS to Joshua Tree — or its unique neighboring town, Twentynine Palms. (Fun fact: there’s actually an old song about the city, or at least one of its citizens, and if you’re anything like the author of this post, you’ll find it ridiculously catchy.)

This weird little desert city is just that: weird. Be sure to take the time out of your Joshua Tree experience to visit and take notice of such attractions as its collection of love signs or grab a cooling brew at the Joshua Tree Saloon. Temperatures can easily top 100 degrees in the summertime, so you’ll need the breather.

6. Monterey Bay, California

Yes, we’ve definitely touted this place before on our destination lists… but it’s easily one of the best places to go camping on the west coast. Nestled between the urban insanity (which we mean in a good way!) of California’s bay area and the serene beauty of Big Sur, Monterey Bay is a great place to camp no matter which side of the landscape you’re exploring.

Along with its variety of driveable day-trip options, Monterey itself is home to some not-to-be-missed attractions, including the famous Monterey Bay Aquarium and the scenic Fisherman’s Wharf. Pebble Beach, which hosts a renowned annual food and wine festival, is just minutes away, as is Carmel-by-the-Sea — and just a few minutes there will quickly make you understand why Clint Eastwood chose it over Hollywood.

7. Grand Canyon National Park and Flagstaff, Arizona

It’s one of the most famous, if not the most famous, national parks for a reason. But the city that lies just an hour south of it is not to be missed, either. Home to Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff has way more than its fair share of arts and culture to explore for a town of its size, not to mention the abject beauty of the surroundings.

You could camp in town and drive up to the rim for the day, or camp inside the national park and make a day trip down to Flagstaff. But either way, don’t do yourself the disservice of missing either of these epic Arizonan travel destinations.

8. Hood River, Oregon


Image via wikipedia.org

Set along the banks of the Columbia River Gorge, Hood River is the perfect camping alternative to Portland. After all, you can still get to town in a day — but you’ll be closer to what you likely really came for: that inimitable Pacific northwest landscape and its endless array of outdoor activity opportunities.

Oh, and did we mention the insane view of the mountain it’s named after?

The town itself is small, but big enough to have all the resources you need to round out an epic Oregon vacation. enjoy one of the craft brews the state’s known for, or, if you’d rather, take in some world-class wine tasting. If all else fails, you can always spend the afternoon watching the windsurfers on the Columbia… or better yet, joining their ranks yourself!

9. Yachats, Oregon


Image via kevinandamanda.com

Yes, Oregon’s so nice we’re listing it twice — and the coast is a whole different thing from exploring the interior.

Although you wouldn’t be remiss to camp nearly anywhere along this stretch of boulder-strewn, tidepool-punctuated coastline, Yachats (pronounced “ya-HOTS”) easily numbers among the most beautiful places in the world, let alone the country. Enjoy the quaint town’s quiet offerings of fresh local seafood and handcrafted beers, and keep your eyes peeled on the ocean: you may just see gray whales breaching. Hike Cape Perpetua for a view you won’t soon forget, and then meander along the coast itself to see the strange effects of an eon of the water crashing against the continent: with names like Thor’s Well and Devils Churn, how can you resist?

10. Asheville, North Carolina Image via ashevillechamber.org

The perfect combination of mountain wilderness and downtown wildness, Asheville stands out among all U.S. cities as a camping contender. Whether it’s manmade or natural, you can’t walk ten feet in Asheville without finding something breathtaking to look at.

And it’s inarguably fun, too. For one thing, the locals contend they have the highest number of breweries per capita (though Portlanders would argue), which makes it easy to kick back after the long day you’ll doubtlessly spend hiking, biking, or waterfall-sliding in the lush surrounding landscapes. Oh, and don’t forget about the amazing local art community, which has proliferated from the River Arts district into the town at large. (If you’ve got a white, grab a quick cup of joe at Summit Coffee, where you might just catch some amazing local talent at the mic.)

11. Taos, New MexicoImage via 5280.com

Unless you’re a ski bunny, you may not have heard the name of this northern New Mexico charmer before. (And if you are a skier or snowboarder, we’re here to tell you that this locale is a worthy destination in summer or winter.)

For one thing, the view of Mt. Wheeler — the tallest in the state — and its surrounding chain of southern Rockies will absolutely floor you, especially at sunset. And that’s before you head to dinner at one of the many local eateries serving up some of the best Mexican cuisine you’ve ever had. It’s no wonder such a scenic town is a haven for artists, and you’ll have ample opportunities to peruse their productions as you walk around the town’s square. And just an hour and a half south, you can double down on the arts-and-outdoors experience in the state’s capital city of Santa Fe. Oh, did we mention there are two world-class hikable hot springs within easy driving distance, not to mention the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge? There’s a reason they call this place the “Land of Enchantment.” (Speaking of which, don’t miss your chance to drive the famous Enchanted Circle!

12. Acadia National Park and Bar Harbor, Maine

Epic granite peaks collide with crashing ocean waves in this gem of the northeastern coast. No matter how you slice it, Acadia is easily one of the most scenic places on earth — and its gateway town of Bar Harbor could easily have its picture beside either “quaint” or “charming” in the dictionary. (Or both.)

Along with the bounty of beautiful sweeping views, visitors to the Maine coastline can find their way into historic lighthouses and all manner of world-class restaurants — you won’t go hungry, especially if you like seafood. Shops, galleries, and museums also abound, drawing visitors in and beckoning them to extend their stays longer and longer.

13. Sandpoint, Idaho

Lake shores, mountain slopes, and a vibrant city — all tucked away in the often-overlooked Idaho panhandle. Sun Valley might get all the glory, but a visit to Sandpoint will prove that great things come in small packages, whether you’re looking to hike, climb, waterski, or just kick back and enjoy the scenery.

Northern Idaho is also home to some of the best remote hot springs in America… although finding them might be a bit of a challenge. Locals like to keep these best-kept-secrets just that: kept. So try and make some friends while you’re in town — you might just get taken along on a soak if you’re not considered a stranger!

14. Rocky Mountain National Park and Boulder, Colorado


Image via bouldercoloradousa.com

Anyone who’s been to the Front Range can tell you that the Rocky Mountain high is real. And hip, bustling Boulder is the perfect place to serve as home base while you enjoy all that Colorful Colorado has to offer.

With its upscale outdoor mall at Pearl Street and its array of artisan coffees and brews, Boulder has just about everything an urbanite could want… all under the closeby gaze of those epic, challenging, unendingly beautiful mountains. Even if you don’t go into the national park proper, there’s tons of stuff to do, with the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests right there, ready to be explored.

The surrounding cities are worth checking out, too; everyone knows about Denver, of course, but Fort Collins should show up on more travel lists. If you do end up there, make sure you make time to take in a film at The Lyric, one of the weirdest, most awesome little indie theaters this author’s ever been to.

15. Custer, South Dakota


Image via travelsouthdakota.com

Herds of wild bison, Needles Highway, Mount Rushmore, and just the plain-old wonder of the Black Hills themselves — no wonder this corner of South Dakota is considered one of the best places to go camping in the midwest. Try your hand — er, foot? feet? lungs? — at summiting Black Elk Peak, and keep your eyes peeled for mountain goats while you’re at it. And yes, the buffalo do roam here, often right by the roadside, but you’ll want to be sure to keep your distance.

As it grows in popularity, the Black Hills region has also become a somewhat surprising oasis of cuisine and culture, tucked away in an otherwise rural area. Learn more about western history at one of the may museums or interpretive centers, and finish it off with a meal fit for a king. It’s all waiting for you in Custer!

Post originally seen on RVShare.com by Jamie Cuttanach

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5 Hikes with Stunning Waterfalls

Whether it’s the mystery of why and how a nearly infinite amount of water cascades over incredible cliff sides, or it’s the mesmerizing echo of roaring water that captivates us, one thing is for sure—waterfalls are one of the most incredible displays of Mother Nature’s power.

So, whether you’re looking to stand above, beneath, or even behind an epic waterfall, we have you covered. We’ve put together the best hikes in the states where spectacular waterfalls steal the spotlight.

Havasu Canyon; Supai, Arizona

Havasu Canyon | Supai, Arizona

Hidden within remote red cliffs and caverns of the Grand Canyon lies an isolated paradise known for its aquamarine cascading waterfalls and travertine pools. Havasu Canyon, a precious and vigorously protected area, sits at the top of every adventurous backpackers’ bucket list.

Merely reaching the trailhead of this desert gem requires patience, planning, and a little bit of luck though. The Havasupai Tribe is intimately connected to these crystalline waters and regulate the region to make sure it’s well-respected.

Day hiking to the falls isn’t permitted, so to plant your boots along the strenuous 10-mile trail you’ll need to get your hands on a coveted reservation and commit to a minimum three-night stay. But once you’re there, we’re pretty sure taking a dip beneath five infamous blue-green falls will keep you calm and captivated.

Keep in mind, this trail isn’t necessarily for beginner backpackers. Summer temps can reach up to 115 degrees, the terrain is unpredictable, and emergency facilities are very few and far between. It’s important to properly prepare and know the risks associated with a trip to the dazzling falls that decorate Havasu Creek.

The Mist Trail | Yosemite National Park, CA

Visitors flock to Yosemite National Park each year to experience the illustrious 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls. And, rightfully so, Yosemite Falls isn’t only one of the tallest waterfalls in the country—it’s a bonafide California icon.

But if you’re in search of waterfall views that you can’t see from the front seat of your car, we recommend you tackle Yosemite’s signature hike, the Mist Trail.

Following the lively Merced river, you’ll conquer 1,000 feet in elevation, 1.5 miles of uphill hiking, and 600 stone steps before reaching the top of 317-foot Vernal Fall, one of the most powerful waterfalls in Yosemite. Some hikers stop here for a snack and head back to the car, but if you have a little more gas in the tank, continue on for 1.3 miles to reach 594-foot Nevada Fall.

The falls thrive in spring and early summer, and the incredible amount of mist (hence the name) from the waterfalls can be a pleasant treat on a hot summer day. Just watch your footing—wet granite can make this trek pretty slippery at times.

Trail of Ten Falls | Silver Falls State Park, OR

The Pacific Northwest knows a thing or two about waterfalls, and nothing proves that point quite like the Trail of Ten Falls. Not only is this trek considered one of the best in Oregon, but it’s also a must-see for anyone with a serious case of waterfall wanderlust.

In fact, the Trail of Ten Falls is home to the second highest concentration of waterfalls in the entire state of Oregon, and there are no less than 10 waterfalls along this modest, 8-mile trail.

And you don’t have to admire the falls from afar. You’ll feel the power of the rushing water as it cascades from canyon cliffs above. That’s right, after weaving through pristine old growth forest, the trail passes directly behind several notorious waterfalls, including 177-foot South falls and 136-foot North Falls.

Gorge Trail | Watkins Glen State Park, New York

Watkins Glen State Park is a New York state gem defined by a majestic 400-foot narrow, hanging gorge and a legendary waterfall-dense trail system. The Gorge Trail, one of few trails available in the park, is arguably one of the most scenic 2-mile treks you can take in the state and features 19 unique waterfalls that are bounded by incredible 200-foot limestone cliffs.

The trail starts from a dark spiraling tunnel that was cut into the cliff-side before descending into a world of natural stone architecture and lush green wilderness.

Following the gorge, the trail meanders past Glen Creek, over charming stone bridges, and negotiates over 800 stone steps. The trail’s appeal, however, comes mainly from the ability to walk directly behind several waterfalls including Cavern Cascade, which plunges nearly 60 feet to the canyon floor.

Cummins Falls | Cummins Falls State Park, Tennessee

Cummins Falls isn’t your everyday cascading waterfall. According to locals, this 75-foot hidden treasure has been the prime swimming hole for escaping Tennessee summer days for over 100 years.

Rumor has it, until recently, hikers had to earn their dip beneath Cummins Falls by scrambling down a treacherous, unmarked trail and wading in ankle-deep water. Today, 211-acre Cummins Falls State Park and its namesake waterfall are protected by the state of Tennessee, and the 2.5-mile trek to the falls are far more accessible.

Still, avid adventurers will appreciate that despite its recent enhancements, the trail to Cummins Falls still requires a bit of on-trail ingenuity. If you want to wade in the natural pools below the falls, you’ll want to prepare for river crossings and expect to traverse some sizable boulders on the river bend.

Post originally seen on Outdoorsy.com

Lichtsinn RV, America’s closest dealer to Winnebago Industries, has been named Top North American Winnebago Dealer by Winnebago Industries for the last four consecutive years. We proudly sell New RVs manufactured by Winnebago Industries as well as Used RVs

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How to Spend a Day in Albuquerque, NM

Albuquerque, New Mexico is a wonderful city, full of art, great food, and convenient transportation options including an airport, train station and bus system. It’s well worth a visit by RV, but choosing where to go and what to do during your stay can be overwhelming. Here’s your guide to where to go and what to do in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Ride the Sandia Park Tramway

This is the world’s longest tramway, and there’s an observation point at the top (10,378 feet) to stop and enjoy the view. There are great hikes nearby, and this makes a great spot to view the sunset too. Rides are $25 for adults.

Hot air balloons, Albuquerque, NM I Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Balloon Fiesta

This is an absolute bucket list item, probably for every RVer out there! For nine days in October, the skies above Albuquerque fill morning and night with hundreds of hot air balloons and pilots from around the world. Entertainers, food and fireworks add to the mix, making the Balloon Fiesta an absolute must see.

Indian Pueblo Cultural Centre

This is a great introduction to local Pueblo culture and history, but we’ve heard Pueblo Harvest, the restaurant inside the museum, is worth a trip in itself! Pro tip: try the blue corn pancakes.

Albuquerque, NM I Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace

Historic Route 66

Historic Route 66, and the new one, go right through Albuquerque! As though you needed another reason to pack your camera.

Wander Historic Old Town Albuquerque

With a mix of shops, museums and restaurants, historic old town deserves a few hours of your time as you explore the adobe architecture here. Plan to grab a bite to eat while you stroll, explore a museum (perhaps the Natural History museum if you’re fond of dinosaurs) and find a souvenir or two.Old Town, Albuquerque, NM I Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace

The Albuquerque Biopark

Here, in historic Old Town, you’ll find an aquarium, botanic gardens and perhaps the best part, the zoo! Here you’ll also find Tingley Beach, perfect for fishing (license required) or taking a walk by the Rio Grande Bosque. There’s no admission charge to visit the beach.

Enjoy the public art

You’ll quickly notice that art is everywhere in Albuquerque! There’s even an ABQ Public Art App to help you find it.

What to eat

There are too many great places to name them all here, but eating some green chiles—perhaps as part of a Green Chile Cheeseburger—is an absolute must while you’re in the area. And if you need to cool down after your green chile adventure, take a detour to La Michoacana De Paquime for some simple and delicious Mexican ice cream. Pro tip: Try the Pine Nut ice cream.

Where to park your RV

One campground option is Rio Grande Nature Center State Park. A day pass is only $5, but if you’re lucky, you can book a campsite here.

If you’d like a more traditional campground, American RV Resort and Albuquerque Central KOA are good options. And if you really want to go deluxe, try the Route 66 Resort at the Casino complex.

Article originally seen on Outdoorsy

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Lichtsinn RV, America’s closest dealer to Winnebago Industries, has been named Top North American Winnebago Dealer by Winnebago Industries for the last four consecutive years. We proudly sell New RVs manufactured by Winnebago Industries as well as Used RVs