5 Reasons Why You Should Go RVing in the Fall

Fall is a great time for an RV adventure. Just because the temperatures drop doesn’t mean that your RV trips have to stop! Here are our 5 reasons why you should go RVing in the Fall – RVing in the Fall

Changing Leaves – The orange, yellow and red hues of autumn have a way of making everything feel cozy. With the tracking apps and websites, it is easier than it has ever been to find the exact dates when the fall foliage is at its most beautiful. For those of you who full-time or have travel flexibility, you may want to follow the leaves as they change throughout the United States – starting early September thru late November.

Cooler Hiking Temperatures –  Heading out on the trail can really be a magical experience during this time of the year. Often you’ll find trails full of vivid gold, red and orange foliage, and it’s also not uncommon to find the trails less crowded than during spring and summer. We’ve gone hiking on many popular trails at State Parks and had the entire place to ourselves — it’s like having your own wilderness playground!

Fewer Crowds – Popular camping areas are often crowded during peak camping weekends during the summertime. Often, other popular recreational activities and destinations are also crowded with other campers. Fewer people camp and RV during the fall, and fewer people often means discounted prices, less noise, and a more secluded camping experience.

No Bugs – Mosquitoes, gnats and flies can ruin a good experience in record time. Luckily for fall campers, insects have usually ended their relentless attacks so you can enjoy things like hiking your favorite trails, relaxing on the RV deck, or hanging out at night just watching the stars.

Cozy Campfires – Campfires are extra cozy in the cooler temperatures. You can layer up with blankets and sit next to a fire with a warm beverage and enjoy the beauty of an autumn evening. RVing in the Fall

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last four consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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Take in Natural Beauty with these Fall RV Trips

Every fall, nature puts on a natural fireworks display of colorful leaves and foliage decorating entire forests full of trees. This display is breathtaking every single year, and some years with the perfect kind of weather can be truly remarkable. However, to fully appreciate the splendor of fall foliage, you need to be in the right place at the right time.

Here are some of the best fall RV trips you can take to be completely amazed at just how colorful nature can really be.

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, namely the park’s Skyline Drive, is one of the nation’s premier fall RV trips for people who want to see fall foliage. The Skyline Drive is a 105-mile National Scenic Byway that twists and winds through the over 200,000 pristine acres that makes up Shenandoah National Park. In addition to the stunning scenery, Shenandoah offers plenty of other outdoor activities as well.

Acadia National Park, Maine

The northeast region of the country has some of the best fall foliage in the world and Acadia National Park in Maine does not disappoint. One of the best roads to take in the park during the peak of the fall colors is called Park Loop Road. Park Loop Road is 27 miles of stunning roadway that offers views of Maine’s shores, coastal forests and mountain peaks. Make sure to remember your camera for this fall RV trip, because it will definitely be one to remember.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee

The Great Smoky Mountains are a beautiful place to visit any time of the year, but autumn makes the region truly stand out. Luckily, visitors have the Great Smoky Mountains National Park to help them enjoy the natural wonders of the area. The best time of year for fall colors here is from mid-October to November. This is when the most colorful trees are on full display. Drive Clingmans Dome Road or the Foothills Parkway for great views. The jewel of the area, though, has to be the Blue Ridge Parkway. You could even drive it all the way to Shenandoah National Park for the best fall RV trip of all time!

Make sure to do a little research when planning your fall RV trip in order to make sure you go at the peak time for fall colors in your chosen region. Most park websites will have up to date information on the quality of fall colors as peak times can change from year to year. After going on a fall RV trip, you might just make it a yearly tradition!

Blog post originally seen on Roadtrippers.com

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last four consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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5 Fabulous Fall RV Destinations

Fall is the perfect time to plan an RV adventure. Crisp air, warm campfires, stunning foliage — what’s not to love? If you need ideas, check out these five fall camping hotspots:

Quechee State Park, Vermont

New England states are famous for their fall foliage, none more so than Vermont. At Quechee State Park, visitors enjoy stunning views of Vermont’s deepest gorge, Quechee Gorge, which is 165 feet deep. The Ottauquechee River runs through the gorge and is known for its whitewater kayaking opportunities. Plan to stay a while and check out the many nearby attractions while you’re in town.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina and Tennessee

Smoky Mountains National Park_MatthewPaulson

Photo: Matthew Paulson/Flickr

One of the most popular parks for leaf-peeping in the South, Great Smoky Mountains National Park offers beautiful drives with an abundance of scenic overlooks that keep visitors coming back year after year. This park offers plenty of choices. It has ten developed campgrounds and a wide variety of recreational opportunities. Some can’t-miss spots here are Clingmans Dome, Cataloochee Valley, Cades Cove and Roaring Fork.

Aspen, Colorado

Aspen Colorado_MarkoForsten

Photo: Marko Forsten/Flickr

As its name suggests, Aspen, Colorado, is full of the spindly, white-barked trees that color the mountainous state in beautiful reds, oranges and yellows every autumn. Here, visitors can see the Maroon Bells, which are said to be among the most photographed mountains in North America. This is a destination that is all about being active outdoors, no matter the season. Fall visitors can take full advantage of the camping, climbing and biking opportunities Aspen has to offer.

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

For a heaping dose of American history coupled with gorgeous autumn scenery, look no further than Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Visit the historic battlefield and drive through Gettysburg National Military Park to see where some of the most significant events of the Civil War unfolded. Choose from a variety of RV parks nearby to set up camp.

Glacier National Park, Montana

Glacier National Park_TomBricker

Photo: Tom Bricker/Flickr

Once you lay eyes on this unspoiled, pristine mountain paradise, you will see why it’s known as “Crown of the Continent.” The land is teeming with wildlife, including the mountain goat, Glacier National Park’s official symbol. Leaves begin to change color in mid-September, and gnewen larch trees create a brilliant, warm contrast to the rocky, snow-capped mountains. Starting in September, after the park’s busy summer season is over, attendance drops off and wildlife becomes more active, making autumn an excellent time to visit for campers who crave solitude in nature. Unlike many leaf-peeping destinations on the East Coast, you don’t even need to make reservations here during fall.

Blog post originally seen on Outdoorsy.com

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last four consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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Tips for Fall RVing

It may seem natural, as you’re packing away the flip-flops and bathing suits at summer’s end, to pack away the RV, too. In locations where the temps drop in autumn, however, you may also see a drop in campground rental rates, crowds and insect populations. Those three reasons alone should have avid RVers prepping the motorhome for another trip.

Ready to give a new season a try? A few simple tips will ensure your first (or fifteenth) foray into fall is a success.

Pick The Right Fall Destination

The number one must-have for fall camping is the perfect destination. Here are a few things to consider as you choose your vacation location:

Average autumn climate plays a big part in knowing where to camp this fall. Asheville, North Carolina, for example, is a fantastic fall camping destination and generally sees highs in the 70s and lows in the 50s in September, dropping to the 60s and 40s by the end of October. That makes for perfect cool weather hiking and serious snuggling by the fire.

Southern Utah’s Canyonlands National Park, on the other hand, is less predictable, with high temps ranging from 60s to 80s and lows from 30 to 50. But what a glorious place it is, and with the right planning, it can become your favorite fall camping destination! Bottom Line: Do your homework and pack for the weather no matter your autumn camping spot.

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Favorite autumn activities should also be considered as you choose where to camp. Do you like to hike, fish or paddle? Does leaf peeping thrill your soul? There are perfect places to do all those things in autumn, so get online or check with local campgrounds about fall adventures in your target area.

Here’s some extra motivation for planning outdoor recreation on your fall camping trip: There’s a world of difference between trail running in August and a cool, crisp run in October. Use cooler weather to move you toward your next goal, whether it’s miles hiked, elevation scaled or hours spent fishing from a kayak.

Campsite availability is one more factor that can help you decide where to travel. In some states where fall quickly turns to winter, campgrounds may close as early as Labor Day. Many campground owners, however, have learned the wisdom of keeping at least some campsites available year-round for cool weather camping enthusiasts. This is where you’ll really need to do a little homework. Once you’ve narrowed down a region you’d like to visit, a quick search at KOA.com will help you find the perfect campground.

What to Pack for Fall Camping

Once you’ve got a destination in mind, your packing list becomes easier. Unload the hot weather gear and fill your bins/totes/backpacks with clothes you can layer if temperatures fall. Even with the best research, the autumn climate can surprise you, especially at higher elevations. Lightweight jackets for hiking, a couple of long-sleeve shirts, warm socks, cool weather foot gear and extra blankets will keep your autumn camping expedition comfortable.

And don’t forget the sunscreen, insect repellent and water bottles! The sun still shines in autumn and some bugs are simply persistent. You don’t want your adventure ruined by a sunburn, bug bites or dehydration.

What else will you need for those outdoor adventures? Will you bring along your bikes, kayaks or climbing gear, or will you arrange for them with local outfitters? Many hiking, paddling and biking clubs now have websites or blogs where current conditions are shared. Check those out as you pack.

Tips for Fall RVing

What about the food? You may spend the summer serving sandwiches and sodas, but fall calls for comfort food! Break out your best Dutch oven chili, shepherd’s pie or vegan stew to warm your crew after a long day hiking mountain trails. Top the chill off with fragrant apple cobbler, pumpkin crisp or warm brownies. Fuel your bodies for cool weather exploration—it’s one of the best parts of camping in autumn.

One more clue about fall camping success—plan ahead to stay dry. Autumn rains don’t need to ruin your trip. It just takes the right rain gear to make it happen. It goes without saying that camping fun can happen in the motorhome even when a shower shuts down outdoor activity. What do you like to do at home on rainy days? Planning for that could make you the family hero!

What to Pack for Fall Camping

The third must-have for fall camping is a safe, dependable RV. A few thoughts about prepping the motorhome or trailer for autumn camping:

  • Double-check tire pressures, brakes and towing gear. In some areas, autumn temps may dip below the freezing mark, which could mean slippery spots on roads. Properly inflated tires, fully functional vehicle and trailer brakes and hitches rated for the weight being towed are essential for safe RV travel. Your best defense, in the case of rapidly deteriorating road conditions, is to wait until roads have been cleared and treated to drive.
  • Know how to operate your RV’s heating system. This sounds silly, but if you’ve only camped in warm weather, turning on the heating system may not be in your skill set. If you’re renting an RV, pay attention to the demo. It goes without saying that your motorhome’s heating system should be checked out periodically by an RV expert to ensure safe operation.
  • Know how to protect your RV’s water systems. On the off chance you’ll experience a hard freeze while camping in autumn, someone in your crew should know how to disconnect water lines from tanks and drain them to prevent damage to water and waste systems. Again, if this is a rental unit, ask what to do if you encounter freezing weather.

Many RVers enjoy camping even into winter, and you can certainly safely enjoy an autumn camping expedition by employing these common sense tips.

Take advantage of cooler temperatures, campground discounts and fewer neighbors by planning a fall RV camping trip now. Choose your destination, plan your activities and pay attention to the weather. Pack for variable temps, prep your RV for safe travel and don’t forget to plan menus that create warm memories! It’s autumn and some of your best days camping by RV await.

Blog originally seen on KOA.com

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last four consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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How to go Dry Camping

One of the greatest things about having an RV is the ability to get in on dry camping or boondocking. Unfortunately, many RVers don’t even know this opportunity exists and therefore miss out entirely.

If RV dry camping is something you’d like to try but you’re not sure how to get started, this is the article for you. Here we will address common boondocking questions and let you in on our favorite dry camping tips.

Some of you may be wondering, “What does dry camping mean?” Basically, this is a term that means camping without any hookups whatsoever. Dry camping, also known as boondocking, can be done on private property (with permission, of course), on government-owned lands, or anywhere else you can find a place to park legally. In most cases this is free camping, so it’s a great option for those on a tight budget.

Tips for Dry Camping

The next thing that most people want to know is how to dry camp. Our number one tip is to dip your toes in first and build up to longer trips as you find your own boondocking groove.

Water Tips: 
Without water or sewer hookups, you will want to learn some ways to carry extra water, how to conserve this precious resource, and ways to get rid of the waste water properly.

Get a bladder — A water bladder such as this one is a great way to carry extra water. Use it to refill your fresh water tank when it runs dry.

Change your shower head and faucets — A low-flow shower head as well as low-flow faucets, can save a lot of water.

Reuse shower or dish water — Instead of using fresh water to flush your toilet, collect your dish and shower water and use it when it’s time to flush. This saves fresh water and makes more room in your gray tank when needed.

Shower less — Of course, showering less helps too. Dry shampoo and wipes help a lot.

Invest in a blue boy — A blue boy can hold onto waste water when your tanks get full and you’re unable to make it to a dump station. It’s also easier to transport a blue boy to and from a dump station than it is to move your entire rig every time you need to dump.

Electricity Tips
Beside water, you’ll also need to find ways to conserve and create electricity when boondocking. Obviously, things like running the air conditioner or a hair dryer are typically out of the question without electric hookups, and even things like lights and vent fans can drain a battery faster than you might imagine.Revel Boondocking

Change to LED lighting — Changing all of your lights to LED will help save electricity.

Get a solar panel — A portable solar panel is relatively inexpensive and can be extremely helpful when it comes to keeping your RV battery topped up.

Invest in more batteries — Of course, having more batteries to work with will also mean more electricity to use when off-grid. Combine these with multiple solar panels for best results.

Use a generator — Most motorhomes come with a camping generator. Meanwhile, those using travel trailers will need to invest in a separate one. Either way, using a generator is a great way to top up your battery and even run the A/C on really hot afternoons. Just be aware that generators shouldn’t be run constantly, or at night out of respect for other campers.

Post originally seen on RVShare.com

Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last four consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

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The Top 15 Camping Cities in the US

You already know you’re going camping this year. The only question is: where to?

If you’ve never traveled by motorhome or trailer before, you may be wondering how to go about finding camping spots — or how to narrow down the best places to camp from the huge number of options on your destination bucket list. The good news is, the U.S. is chock-a-block full of amazing places to explore in your RV. The only problem is trying to see them all in just one lifetime!

Which means, of course, that you’ve got some narrowing down to do. After all, most of us can’t quite afford to be on permanent vacation. (Full-time RV living is a thing though, and quite a popular one.

But whether you’re a weekend warrior looking for a quick getaway spot or planning your next epic cross-country road trip, we’ve put together some of the very best campgrounds and camping locations in the U.S.A — and some surefire tips to help you find great spots no matter where you’re headed.

The Top Camping Spots in the U.S.

In no particular order, here are some of the best places to go camping in the U.S., including national parks which have some of the top campgrounds in the nation.

1. Moab, Utah

Nestled right between two of the most popular national parks in the system — Arches and Canyonlands — Moab is the perfect place to plant yourself if you’re looking to explore southeastern Utah’s surreal desert landscape. See the stunning, delicate expanses of sandstone arches and glowing red mesas carved by centuries of geological activity, or take a thrilling whitewater ride down the ancient Colorado River.

Plus, once you’ve had your fill of outdoor fun (if that’s possible), Moab itself has a whole lot to offer in the way of slightly-citified excitement. Enjoy a bite at one of its many well-loved local eateries, or meander through its gift shops and informational centers. The town is also home to a variety of museums with tons of local historical artifacts and educational opportunities. The Museum of Moab has a world-class collection of dinosaur bones on display, too — so it’s a can’t-miss if you have an aspiring paleontologist along for the ride!

2. Glacier National Park and Whitefish, Montana


Image via skimag.com

If your camping bucket list includes Glacier National Park — and whose doesn’t? — don’t miss the chance to enjoy this quaint northern Montana town while you’re in the area. Along with a plethora of shops from which to source your (absolutely mandatory) bear spray, Whitefish also offers a vibrant art scene, as well as an array of culinary delights you might not have expected to find at such an extreme latitude. Meander through the many galleries that line the small, walkable downtown, and then dip into one of its breweries or fine restaurants to take the edge off. A personal recommendation: visit Montana Coffee Traders, which combines a restful atmosphere with great java and a slam-dunk menu of freshly-cooked breakfast options. (No, they’re not paying us to say this.)

3. Saint Augustine, Florida

Not only is Saint Augustine one of the best places to go camping on the east coast — it’s also one of the oldest. Actually, it’s the oldest city in America, not just on the east coast but overall. Settled all the way back in 1565 by Spanish explorers, the city’s been constantly inhabited by one population or another for more than 450 years. (And yes, that makes it older than both Plymouth Rock and Jamestown.)

This beachside gem is the perfect spot to set up camp along the dunes, perhaps at Anastasia State Park. The sites are affordable, but the sights are downright priceless, and you’re just a few minutes’ drive from the town’s historic center, with all manner of food, drink, shopping, and — of course — ghost tour options to choose from. Experiences you are absolutely not allowed to miss: cannon firings at the Castillo de San Marcos, a horse-drawn carriage ride through the city streets, shopping on St. George Street, and cocktails at the Ice Plant to round it all out. Oh, and an ice cream-topped waffle at Cousteau’s. (Thank us later.)

4. Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Gatlinburg, Tennessee

Great Smoky Mountains stands out from its US national parks peer group in a variety of ways. For one thing, it’s the most popular. For another, few of the national parks have such a vibrant gateway city — and fewer still are free to enter.

With hundreds of miles of hiking trails along some of the most lushly green mountain paths you’ll ever see, Great Smoky Mountains is a can’t-miss destination, especially for native east coasters. Covering more than 522,427 acres, the park is a reasonable drive from a huge number of eastern metropoles, and offers much-needed natural respite to those city dwellers. And even if Gatlinburg is a little bit out of your way, it’s worth the extra miles to stay there. You can round out your days of outdoorsy exploration with all sorts of mountain town fun, from tastings at moonshine distilleries to ski lifts that operate even in the summer. (Oh, and Pigeon Forge is just half an hour up the road, home to a downright disproportionate number of dinner shows and live entertainment options. No wonder Dolly Parton loves it here so much!)

5. Joshua Tree National Park and Twentynine Palms, California

If you’ve yet to go to this alien desert landscape, where the trees twist into the sky like reaching arms, you won’t regret setting your RV GPS to Joshua Tree — or its unique neighboring town, Twentynine Palms. (Fun fact: there’s actually an old song about the city, or at least one of its citizens, and if you’re anything like the author of this post, you’ll find it ridiculously catchy.)

This weird little desert city is just that: weird. Be sure to take the time out of your Joshua Tree experience to visit and take notice of such attractions as its collection of love signs or grab a cooling brew at the Joshua Tree Saloon. Temperatures can easily top 100 degrees in the summertime, so you’ll need the breather.

6. Monterey Bay, California

Yes, we’ve definitely touted this place before on our destination lists… but it’s easily one of the best places to go camping on the west coast. Nestled between the urban insanity (which we mean in a good way!) of California’s bay area and the serene beauty of Big Sur, Monterey Bay is a great place to camp no matter which side of the landscape you’re exploring.

Along with its variety of driveable day-trip options, Monterey itself is home to some not-to-be-missed attractions, including the famous Monterey Bay Aquarium and the scenic Fisherman’s Wharf. Pebble Beach, which hosts a renowned annual food and wine festival, is just minutes away, as is Carmel-by-the-Sea — and just a few minutes there will quickly make you understand why Clint Eastwood chose it over Hollywood.

7. Grand Canyon National Park and Flagstaff, Arizona

It’s one of the most famous, if not the most famous, national parks for a reason. But the city that lies just an hour south of it is not to be missed, either. Home to Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff has way more than its fair share of arts and culture to explore for a town of its size, not to mention the abject beauty of the surroundings.

You could camp in town and drive up to the rim for the day, or camp inside the national park and make a day trip down to Flagstaff. But either way, don’t do yourself the disservice of missing either of these epic Arizonan travel destinations.

8. Hood River, Oregon


Image via wikipedia.org

Set along the banks of the Columbia River Gorge, Hood River is the perfect camping alternative to Portland. After all, you can still get to town in a day — but you’ll be closer to what you likely really came for: that inimitable Pacific northwest landscape and its endless array of outdoor activity opportunities.

Oh, and did we mention the insane view of the mountain it’s named after?

The town itself is small, but big enough to have all the resources you need to round out an epic Oregon vacation. enjoy one of the craft brews the state’s known for, or, if you’d rather, take in some world-class wine tasting. If all else fails, you can always spend the afternoon watching the windsurfers on the Columbia… or better yet, joining their ranks yourself!

9. Yachats, Oregon


Image via kevinandamanda.com

Yes, Oregon’s so nice we’re listing it twice — and the coast is a whole different thing from exploring the interior.

Although you wouldn’t be remiss to camp nearly anywhere along this stretch of boulder-strewn, tidepool-punctuated coastline, Yachats (pronounced “ya-HOTS”) easily numbers among the most beautiful places in the world, let alone the country. Enjoy the quaint town’s quiet offerings of fresh local seafood and handcrafted beers, and keep your eyes peeled on the ocean: you may just see gray whales breaching. Hike Cape Perpetua for a view you won’t soon forget, and then meander along the coast itself to see the strange effects of an eon of the water crashing against the continent: with names like Thor’s Well and Devils Churn, how can you resist?

10. Asheville, North Carolina Image via ashevillechamber.org

The perfect combination of mountain wilderness and downtown wildness, Asheville stands out among all U.S. cities as a camping contender. Whether it’s manmade or natural, you can’t walk ten feet in Asheville without finding something breathtaking to look at.

And it’s inarguably fun, too. For one thing, the locals contend they have the highest number of breweries per capita (though Portlanders would argue), which makes it easy to kick back after the long day you’ll doubtlessly spend hiking, biking, or waterfall-sliding in the lush surrounding landscapes. Oh, and don’t forget about the amazing local art community, which has proliferated from the River Arts district into the town at large. (If you’ve got a white, grab a quick cup of joe at Summit Coffee, where you might just catch some amazing local talent at the mic.)

11. Taos, New MexicoImage via 5280.com

Unless you’re a ski bunny, you may not have heard the name of this northern New Mexico charmer before. (And if you are a skier or snowboarder, we’re here to tell you that this locale is a worthy destination in summer or winter.)

For one thing, the view of Mt. Wheeler — the tallest in the state — and its surrounding chain of southern Rockies will absolutely floor you, especially at sunset. And that’s before you head to dinner at one of the many local eateries serving up some of the best Mexican cuisine you’ve ever had. It’s no wonder such a scenic town is a haven for artists, and you’ll have ample opportunities to peruse their productions as you walk around the town’s square. And just an hour and a half south, you can double down on the arts-and-outdoors experience in the state’s capital city of Santa Fe. Oh, did we mention there are two world-class hikable hot springs within easy driving distance, not to mention the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge? There’s a reason they call this place the “Land of Enchantment.” (Speaking of which, don’t miss your chance to drive the famous Enchanted Circle!

12. Acadia National Park and Bar Harbor, Maine

Epic granite peaks collide with crashing ocean waves in this gem of the northeastern coast. No matter how you slice it, Acadia is easily one of the most scenic places on earth — and its gateway town of Bar Harbor could easily have its picture beside either “quaint” or “charming” in the dictionary. (Or both.)

Along with the bounty of beautiful sweeping views, visitors to the Maine coastline can find their way into historic lighthouses and all manner of world-class restaurants — you won’t go hungry, especially if you like seafood. Shops, galleries, and museums also abound, drawing visitors in and beckoning them to extend their stays longer and longer.

13. Sandpoint, Idaho

Lake shores, mountain slopes, and a vibrant city — all tucked away in the often-overlooked Idaho panhandle. Sun Valley might get all the glory, but a visit to Sandpoint will prove that great things come in small packages, whether you’re looking to hike, climb, waterski, or just kick back and enjoy the scenery.

Northern Idaho is also home to some of the best remote hot springs in America… although finding them might be a bit of a challenge. Locals like to keep these best-kept-secrets just that: kept. So try and make some friends while you’re in town — you might just get taken along on a soak if you’re not considered a stranger!

14. Rocky Mountain National Park and Boulder, Colorado


Image via bouldercoloradousa.com

Anyone who’s been to the Front Range can tell you that the Rocky Mountain high is real. And hip, bustling Boulder is the perfect place to serve as home base while you enjoy all that Colorful Colorado has to offer.

With its upscale outdoor mall at Pearl Street and its array of artisan coffees and brews, Boulder has just about everything an urbanite could want… all under the closeby gaze of those epic, challenging, unendingly beautiful mountains. Even if you don’t go into the national park proper, there’s tons of stuff to do, with the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests right there, ready to be explored.

The surrounding cities are worth checking out, too; everyone knows about Denver, of course, but Fort Collins should show up on more travel lists. If you do end up there, make sure you make time to take in a film at The Lyric, one of the weirdest, most awesome little indie theaters this author’s ever been to.

15. Custer, South Dakota


Image via travelsouthdakota.com

Herds of wild bison, Needles Highway, Mount Rushmore, and just the plain-old wonder of the Black Hills themselves — no wonder this corner of South Dakota is considered one of the best places to go camping in the midwest. Try your hand — er, foot? feet? lungs? — at summiting Black Elk Peak, and keep your eyes peeled for mountain goats while you’re at it. And yes, the buffalo do roam here, often right by the roadside, but you’ll want to be sure to keep your distance.

As it grows in popularity, the Black Hills region has also become a somewhat surprising oasis of cuisine and culture, tucked away in an otherwise rural area. Learn more about western history at one of the may museums or interpretive centers, and finish it off with a meal fit for a king. It’s all waiting for you in Custer!

Post originally seen on RVShare.com by Jamie Cuttanach

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Experience the Best℠ at Lichtsinn RV, the #1 Winnebago Dealer in North America for the last four consecutive years. Lichtsinn RV is located 1 mile north of Winnebago Industries in Forest City, IA and we proudly sell new Winnebago motorhomes and pre-owned RVs from various manufacturers. While at Lichtsinn RV, you can expect no delivery miles on new RVs, a complimentary half-day educational orientation of your RVexcellent guest reviews, an assigned support team from sales, parts, service and the business officesuperior accommodationsno-hassle pricing and competitive financing. See our extensive new and used inventory here.

 

 

5 Hikes with Stunning Waterfalls

Whether it’s the mystery of why and how a nearly infinite amount of water cascades over incredible cliff sides, or it’s the mesmerizing echo of roaring water that captivates us, one thing is for sure—waterfalls are one of the most incredible displays of Mother Nature’s power.

So, whether you’re looking to stand above, beneath, or even behind an epic waterfall, we have you covered. We’ve put together the best hikes in the states where spectacular waterfalls steal the spotlight.

Havasu Canyon; Supai, Arizona

Havasu Canyon | Supai, Arizona

Hidden within remote red cliffs and caverns of the Grand Canyon lies an isolated paradise known for its aquamarine cascading waterfalls and travertine pools. Havasu Canyon, a precious and vigorously protected area, sits at the top of every adventurous backpackers’ bucket list.

Merely reaching the trailhead of this desert gem requires patience, planning, and a little bit of luck though. The Havasupai Tribe is intimately connected to these crystalline waters and regulate the region to make sure it’s well-respected.

Day hiking to the falls isn’t permitted, so to plant your boots along the strenuous 10-mile trail you’ll need to get your hands on a coveted reservation and commit to a minimum three-night stay. But once you’re there, we’re pretty sure taking a dip beneath five infamous blue-green falls will keep you calm and captivated.

Keep in mind, this trail isn’t necessarily for beginner backpackers. Summer temps can reach up to 115 degrees, the terrain is unpredictable, and emergency facilities are very few and far between. It’s important to properly prepare and know the risks associated with a trip to the dazzling falls that decorate Havasu Creek.

The Mist Trail | Yosemite National Park, CA

Visitors flock to Yosemite National Park each year to experience the illustrious 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls. And, rightfully so, Yosemite Falls isn’t only one of the tallest waterfalls in the country—it’s a bonafide California icon.

But if you’re in search of waterfall views that you can’t see from the front seat of your car, we recommend you tackle Yosemite’s signature hike, the Mist Trail.

Following the lively Merced river, you’ll conquer 1,000 feet in elevation, 1.5 miles of uphill hiking, and 600 stone steps before reaching the top of 317-foot Vernal Fall, one of the most powerful waterfalls in Yosemite. Some hikers stop here for a snack and head back to the car, but if you have a little more gas in the tank, continue on for 1.3 miles to reach 594-foot Nevada Fall.

The falls thrive in spring and early summer, and the incredible amount of mist (hence the name) from the waterfalls can be a pleasant treat on a hot summer day. Just watch your footing—wet granite can make this trek pretty slippery at times.

Trail of Ten Falls | Silver Falls State Park, OR

The Pacific Northwest knows a thing or two about waterfalls, and nothing proves that point quite like the Trail of Ten Falls. Not only is this trek considered one of the best in Oregon, but it’s also a must-see for anyone with a serious case of waterfall wanderlust.

In fact, the Trail of Ten Falls is home to the second highest concentration of waterfalls in the entire state of Oregon, and there are no less than 10 waterfalls along this modest, 8-mile trail.

And you don’t have to admire the falls from afar. You’ll feel the power of the rushing water as it cascades from canyon cliffs above. That’s right, after weaving through pristine old growth forest, the trail passes directly behind several notorious waterfalls, including 177-foot South falls and 136-foot North Falls.

Gorge Trail | Watkins Glen State Park, New York

Watkins Glen State Park is a New York state gem defined by a majestic 400-foot narrow, hanging gorge and a legendary waterfall-dense trail system. The Gorge Trail, one of few trails available in the park, is arguably one of the most scenic 2-mile treks you can take in the state and features 19 unique waterfalls that are bounded by incredible 200-foot limestone cliffs.

The trail starts from a dark spiraling tunnel that was cut into the cliff-side before descending into a world of natural stone architecture and lush green wilderness.

Following the gorge, the trail meanders past Glen Creek, over charming stone bridges, and negotiates over 800 stone steps. The trail’s appeal, however, comes mainly from the ability to walk directly behind several waterfalls including Cavern Cascade, which plunges nearly 60 feet to the canyon floor.

Cummins Falls | Cummins Falls State Park, Tennessee

Cummins Falls isn’t your everyday cascading waterfall. According to locals, this 75-foot hidden treasure has been the prime swimming hole for escaping Tennessee summer days for over 100 years.

Rumor has it, until recently, hikers had to earn their dip beneath Cummins Falls by scrambling down a treacherous, unmarked trail and wading in ankle-deep water. Today, 211-acre Cummins Falls State Park and its namesake waterfall are protected by the state of Tennessee, and the 2.5-mile trek to the falls are far more accessible.

Still, avid adventurers will appreciate that despite its recent enhancements, the trail to Cummins Falls still requires a bit of on-trail ingenuity. If you want to wade in the natural pools below the falls, you’ll want to prepare for river crossings and expect to traverse some sizable boulders on the river bend.

Post originally seen on Outdoorsy.com

Lichtsinn RV, America’s closest dealer to Winnebago Industries, has been named Top North American Winnebago Dealer by Winnebago Industries for the last four consecutive years. We proudly sell New RVs manufactured by Winnebago Industries as well as Used RVs

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How to Spend a Day in Albuquerque, NM

Albuquerque, New Mexico is a wonderful city, full of art, great food, and convenient transportation options including an airport, train station and bus system. It’s well worth a visit by RV, but choosing where to go and what to do during your stay can be overwhelming. Here’s your guide to where to go and what to do in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Ride the Sandia Park Tramway

This is the world’s longest tramway, and there’s an observation point at the top (10,378 feet) to stop and enjoy the view. There are great hikes nearby, and this makes a great spot to view the sunset too. Rides are $25 for adults.

Hot air balloons, Albuquerque, NM I Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Balloon Fiesta

This is an absolute bucket list item, probably for every RVer out there! For nine days in October, the skies above Albuquerque fill morning and night with hundreds of hot air balloons and pilots from around the world. Entertainers, food and fireworks add to the mix, making the Balloon Fiesta an absolute must see.

Indian Pueblo Cultural Centre

This is a great introduction to local Pueblo culture and history, but we’ve heard Pueblo Harvest, the restaurant inside the museum, is worth a trip in itself! Pro tip: try the blue corn pancakes.

Albuquerque, NM I Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace

Historic Route 66

Historic Route 66, and the new one, go right through Albuquerque! As though you needed another reason to pack your camera.

Wander Historic Old Town Albuquerque

With a mix of shops, museums and restaurants, historic old town deserves a few hours of your time as you explore the adobe architecture here. Plan to grab a bite to eat while you stroll, explore a museum (perhaps the Natural History museum if you’re fond of dinosaurs) and find a souvenir or two.Old Town, Albuquerque, NM I Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace

The Albuquerque Biopark

Here, in historic Old Town, you’ll find an aquarium, botanic gardens and perhaps the best part, the zoo! Here you’ll also find Tingley Beach, perfect for fishing (license required) or taking a walk by the Rio Grande Bosque. There’s no admission charge to visit the beach.

Enjoy the public art

You’ll quickly notice that art is everywhere in Albuquerque! There’s even an ABQ Public Art App to help you find it.

What to eat

There are too many great places to name them all here, but eating some green chiles—perhaps as part of a Green Chile Cheeseburger—is an absolute must while you’re in the area. And if you need to cool down after your green chile adventure, take a detour to La Michoacana De Paquime for some simple and delicious Mexican ice cream. Pro tip: Try the Pine Nut ice cream.

Where to park your RV

One campground option is Rio Grande Nature Center State Park. A day pass is only $5, but if you’re lucky, you can book a campsite here.

If you’d like a more traditional campground, American RV Resort and Albuquerque Central KOA are good options. And if you really want to go deluxe, try the Route 66 Resort at the Casino complex.

Article originally seen on Outdoorsy

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Lichtsinn RV, America’s closest dealer to Winnebago Industries, has been named Top North American Winnebago Dealer by Winnebago Industries for the last four consecutive years. We proudly sell New RVs manufactured by Winnebago Industries as well as Used RVs

5 Apps to Help You Find Your Next RV Spot

One of the best parts of RVing is discovering new places. However, places that are new aren’t very familiar! So, when we need to find a good campground in a new place, we rely on these 5 apps to find campsites.

1. Campendium

Campendium is probably our favorite app. It was the first app I learned to use to help Jon find campsites. The search function is very intuitive. Both on the website and the mobile app, the search box is front and center. You can type in your destination. Or, in a pinch, you can quickly select from nearby RV parks, public land, free camping, overnight parking, and even dump stations.

campendium app

2. Reserve America

When we first began to RV, Reserve America was a favorite app of ours. Even now, as experienced RVers, it remains our favorite app for finding State Parks and reserving stays at State Parks. Reserve America is also a helpful tool for finding and reserving RV park campsites as well. The main benefit to using this app is that you’re able to make and pay for your reservations right within the app. We find the app to be easy, clear, and straightforward when it comes to securing and paying for reservations.

3. Park Adviser

One of the most robust apps is the Park Advisor RV Parks and Campgrounds app. We find it impressive because it includes many points that are of special interest to RVers. A map will not only show you campgrounds, but also nearby Cracker Barrels, Walmarts, Flying Js, Sam’s Clubs, Costcos, and dump stations. This app is excellent if you’ve arrived to an area ahead of schedule and your reservation hasn’t yet begun. It’s also helpful if you’ve had to unexpectedly change plans. You may need to spend a night at a Walmart or Cracker Barrel before regrouping and moving on to a campground.

find your campsite

4. iOverlander

The ability to search for established and “informal” campgrounds internationally is iOverlander’s strength. If your RV travels are taking you into Canada or Mexico, this is a great app to use. It’s also useful if you plan on flying to a country and then RVing for part of your visit. In addition to campgrounds, the app allows you to search for dump stations, wild camping, and propane. Another unique feature is the ability to filter your search results by how old user reviews are, since the quality of a campsite can change over time. You can filter out results that don’t have reviews within the last 3 months, 6 months, and 1-5 years.

5. The Dyrt

The Dyrt is a newer app serving the needs of both RVers and tent campers. As an Rver, you’ll want to be sure the search result you click has the icon for “RV sites.” Being that the app is newer, it isn’t as robust as some of the others on the list, but it is the most interactive. You can earn points and prizes for submitting reviews of the campgrounds that you stay at. They also have a quick search where you can explore campgrounds by state. This initially sorts the campgrounds with “top campgrounds,” as determined by reviews, at the top of the results.

Article originally published on WinnebagoLife.com

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The 17 Best Roads in America

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: the very best road trips aren’t about the destination.

Especially in the RV world, it’s all about the journey — and making that trip as memorable, comfortable, and beautiful as possible. Seeking out the scenic view has been a road trip tradition since road trips were a thing. In fact, that’s one of the most attractive aspects of road tripping in the first place: You actually have the time (and are generally traveling slowly enough) to take in the beauty of the road you’re traveling. Don’t get us wrong, the views out of an airplane window can be beautiful… but it’s hard to pick out individual details from 35,000 feet!

We think RVing goes hand in hand with taking the back roads, the slow roads, the roads that don’t necessarily get you where you’re going fast… but which you’ll always remember. And many of the roads we’re about to talk about are so beautiful, you’ll be glad they aren’t getting you anywhere fast. In fact, you may just wish they went on even longer!

 

So buckle up, campers! It’s time to hit the road. And while it may not be a short journey, it’s definitely going to be a good one.

Best Scenic Drives in the USA

Alright, enough chatter about logistics. You’re looking to take the ultimate American road trip, right?

If stunning scenery is what you’re after, here are 17 of the very best US trips to consider.

1. 17-Mile Drive, California


Image via tripsavvy.com

Don’t get us wrong: You should definitely take the Pacific Coast Highway through Big Sur. (In fact, for best results, start in San Diego and don’t stop until Vancouver.)

But this short, privately-owned drive around the jutting coastline of Pebble Beach is lesser known, though just as stunning. Coastal cliffs on one side and snow-white sand beaches on the other, all under the perfect everpresent breeze of central coast California… how can you go wrong?

Do note, however, that admission to 17-Mile Drive does require a fee of $10.25 per vehicle, which can be paid in cash only. This price is reimbursed with a $35 purchase at most Pebble Beach Resorts restaurants, except for Pebble Beach Market.

2. Beartooth Highway, Montana and Wyoming


Image via yellowstonepark.com

Winding its way through almost 70 miles of these two mountain momma states, Beartooth Highway is a must-do if you’re visiting nearby Yellowstone. It’s an easy way to get acquainted to one of the most biodiverse landscapes in the country — and a whole lot of natural beauty, to boot. Glacial lakes, forest-covered valleys, and waterfalls await, as do mountain goats, grizzly bears, and wolves. It’s definitely worth taking the slow way in the heart of America’s first federally-preserved ecosystems!

3. Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina and Virginia


Image via blueridgeparkway.org

Spanning more than 400 smoky, roaming miles, the Blue Ridge Parkway may just be correct in naming itself “America’s Favorite Drive.”  If you take on the entire thing, you’ll pass through two states and countless ancient mountain valleys — not to mention all the unique attractions and stops there are to make along the way. Whether you go during the lush greenery of summer or the leaf-changing transition of fall, the view is a hard act to follow.

Along with hiking, biking, and other outdoorsy opportunities, this part of the country is also well-known for its delicious, estate-grown wines and craft beers. In fact, the Blue Ridge Parkway winds right past Asheville, which has one of the highest numbers of breweries per capita in the entire country.

4. Bluebonnet Trails, Texas


Image via tripadvisor.com

Although it’s just 35 miles outside of Dallas, you may not have heard of Ennis, Texas — but if you want to see one of the most heartstopping displays of bluebonnets in the country, you may consider typing it into your GPS. Designated by the state in 1997 as the “Official Bluebonnet City of Texas,” the town is also the nexus of almost 40 miles of wildflower-strewn driving routes, bubbling over with these violet beauties each April.

Even More Gorgeous Road Trip Ideas

We’re not done yet! If you’re looking for a scenic road in America, here are just a few to pick from.

5. Death Valley Scenic Byway, Death Valley National Park, California


Image via scenicusa.net

Lowest, hottest, and arguably most surreal: Death Valley is well known to be a land of extremes. But even if you’re not prepared to tackle this demanding landscape on foot, you can get some taste of its intensity simply by simply driving through it.

Spanning 81 miles of CA-190 between Olancha and Death Valley Junction, this scenic road cuts right through the heart of the National Park — which you will need to pay an entry fee for. (Psst: If you’re doing lots of National Park travel this year, consider upgrading to the annual America the Beautiful Pass; it’s only $80, or even less for certain demographics, and you’ll get into over 2,000 federal recreational sites free of charge!)

6. Florida’s Route 17 Scenic Highway


Image via floridahikes.com

Yeah, yeah, we’ve all heard about the Overseas Highway and the Seven Mile Bridge. But if you want to see what real, old Florida looks like, you’ve got to head to the center, where live oak canopies are punctuated by vast fields of farmland that are still being worked to this day.

As you cut through the heart of the state on this 60 mile drive from Loughman to Sebring, you’ll pass citrus fields, farmhouses, lakes, and cold springs — which are definitely worth taking a detour for. At 74 degrees year round, there’s never a wrong time to take a quick dip!

7. Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, Montana


Image via greatfallstribune.com

Another national park scenic byway, this drive may just be one of the most famous American roads on the list. But thanks to the area’s extreme northern latitude and elevation, you’ll have to time your trip right if you want to experience it!

Because of the ice and snow that give this Montana national park its name, many parts of Glacier are inaccessible for a broad swath of the year — including its most celebrated scenic route. The road may not be entirely plowed and clear for vehicular traffic until well into July, depending on the season.

But if you visit the Crown of the Continent in the summertime, you’ll be rewarded not only with this stunning drive, but with amazing hiking opportunities revealing high alpine lakes and forests that seem brought to life from a fairy tale. Just be sure to be safe with your food and hike in groups. Northern Montana is grizzly bear country!

8. Needles Highway, South Dakota


Image via visitrapidcity.com

This 14-mile stretch of South Dakota Highway 87 was actually considered “impossible” to construct by its detractors back in the nineteen-teens — but sure enough, its builders persisted, creating a winding series of sharp turns through awe-inducing granite peaks and spires. The loop is only about 30 miles south of Rapid City, tucked in the northern section of Custer State Park. Since you’ll already be paying for entry, take advantage of the area’s ample hiking, fishing, and bison-watching opportunities — herds often graze and lounge just feet from the roadside.

9. Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon


Image via traveloregon.com

Known by locals as “the King of Roads,” this historic scenic byway winds its way through the gorge, past waterfalls, streams, wildflowers, and plateaus. You’ll definitely want to get out your hiking map to figure out where along the way to stop and explore on foot. Although some of the area is presently shut down due to wildfire damage, several trails remain open, according to the USDA.

10. Lemhi Pass, Montana and Idaho


Image via lewis-clark.org

Straddling the border of two of the most mountainous states in the union, Lemhi Pass passes through the Beaverhead range, a subset of the Bitterroot section of the Rocky Mountains. It follows the continental divide, meaning it’s a whopping 7,373 feet above sea level. And although it’s fairly easily accessible from either stateside (and has actually been designated a National Historical Landmark), it is an unpaved road, which means you may need to disconnect your tow vehicle before you venture down it!

11. Loneliest Highway, Nevada


Image via reddit.com

U.S. Route 50 is actually a transcontinental road, running more than 3,000 miles from Ocean City, Maryland to Sacramento. That means it meanders through lots of rural landscapes — but the section that knifes Nevada in half was named “The Loneliest Road in America” by LIFE magazine back in 1986, and no one could really argue.

The nickname has stuck, as has the lack of population and traffic (so far). So if you’re looking to feel like you’re all the way out there, plan this driving route on the way to or from Las Vegas or Great Basin.

12. North Cascades Highway, Washington


Image via jaguarbellevue.com

Washington State Route 20 is the northernmost way across the Cascade Mountain Range, and is a subsection of the larger Cascade Loop, a 400-mile tour of this unique and stunning biosphere. Lush greenery, gem-like blue lakes, and precipitous cliff faces await the brave explorer who takes this trip through the American Alps.

13. Park Loop Road, Acadia National Park, Maine


Image via royalcaribbean.com

Beginning (and ending) at the Hulls Cove Visitor Center inside Maine’s famous, granite-peak-studded Acadia National Park, this 27-mile drive showcases Acadia’s lakes, mountains, forest, and its signature rocky coast. If you drive a particularly large RV, however, be forewarned: much of the route is one-way traffic only, and it does traverse some narrow passages.

The Best Road Trips for Scenic Travel

Which is the best road? The most beautiful, of course.

14. The Road to Hana, Hawaii


Image via hawaii.com

You may have to fly (or boat, or… swim a long way?) to get there, but once you’re in — er, on? — the Aloha State, this epic drive awaits. Plush jungle landscapes and breathtaking coastlines combine to create one of the most visually diverse and stunning driving experiences in the country, all punctuated with fascinating historical and cultural sites where you can learn more about the early days of Hawaii.

15. Silver Thread Scenic and Historic Byway, Colorado


Image via colorado.com

This 120-mile drive through some of the most beautiful parts of consistently-stunning Colorado will wind you by pouring waterfalls, glassy lakes, and small towns dotted with interesting attractions. Creede, Colorado, for instance, has a population of less than 300 — but its Repertory Theater was named “one of the 10 best places to see the lights way off Broadway” by USA Today. Creede is also home to the Underground Mining Museum, which can help you learn more about the silver boom to which the town owes its foundation… and the hardscrabble lifestyle of the men who actually did the digging.

16. Ten Mile Drive, Rhode Island


Image via loadedlandscapes.com

This scenic drive may be a short one — but it packs a whole lot of beauty into its handful of miles. (Besides, what else would you expect from the smallest state in the union?)

Traversing the perimeter of the peninsula south of Newport, this drive is divided into four legs:  Brenton Cove Shore, East Passage of Narragansett Bay, Ocean Drive, and Bellevue Ave. You’ll see historic homes and mansions bespeaking a gilded age, when wealthy New Yorkers would make their way south to their Rhode Island summer homes in the late 1800s. You’ll also pass the state’s stunning Brenton Point State Park, whose windswept beaches draw both amateur and competitive kite flyers.

17. The High Road to Taos, New Mexico


Image via highestbridges.com

Yes, there are more direct routes from New Mexico’s capital to its favorite ski bowl — but this slightly longer drive is sure to show you why artists like Ansel Adams and Georgia O’Keeffe found the high desert landscape so intriguing. After taking 84 north to the south end of Española, you’ll cut east on 76 to pass through the charming little town of Chimayo, before meandering through a few more small towns within the pine-filled (and decidedly un-desert-like) Carson National Forest.

Finally, you’ll arrive in Taos, where the well-known mountains loom large over the striking cut of the Rio Grande Gorge. Don’t miss a stop on the bridge of the same name — but even if you’re not normally afraid of heights, be sure to prepare your stomach.

Ready to take a Road Trip in the USA to Remember?

Here’s the thing: considering how large and lovely this country of ours is, pretty much any American road trip can be one to remember. No matter which state you start in or what destination you’ve got your sights set on, there’s a gorgeous USA road that’ll take you there — even if it does take just a little bit longer than the most direct route.

Happy trails to you, campers. May they always be the most scenic ones available, even if they’re not the fastest! After all, it’s not a race — it’s a journey.

Lichtsinn RV, America’s closest dealer to Winnebago Industries, has been named Top North American Winnebago Dealer by Winnebago Industries for the last four consecutive years. We proudly sell New RVs manufactured by Winnebago Industries as well as Used RVs.

Post originally seen on RVShare.com